Understanding the mysterious disability of autism

Today's polar bear is superbly adapted to life in the Arctic Wolly mammoth cold adaptation The mammoth parted from Elephants in Africa million years ago.

Understanding the mysterious disability of autism

Life turns it into a mind. Its content grew in a haphazard manner over the years. When I encountered a brain science article or topic that seemed particularly relevant to my interests in education, I added it to the IAE-pedia Brain Science page.

I made little effort to relate the new section to previous sections. Moreover, the topics were arranged in alphabetical order rather than being grouped into related topics.

In spite of these shortcomings, the Brain Science page grew in popularity. By the end of March,it had had aboutpage views—which made it fourth in popularity in the list of IAE-pedia content pages. Now, nearly four months later, I have completed this project. The result is a book, Brain Science for Educators and Parents.

The book contains a great deal of information that I feel will prove valuable to educators, parents, and others who are interested in the capabilities and limitations of the human brain.

Overview This book provides an introduction to brain science that is Understanding the mysterious disability of autism designed for preservice and inservice K teachers, and for teachers of these teachers.

However, parents, grandparents, childcare providers, and others who are interested in K education will find the book useful. Here are two important and unifying questions addressed throughout the book: What should preservice teachers, inservice K teachers, and parents know about brain science?

How should K teachers be using their knowledge of brain science, both to improve their teaching and to help their students gain brain science knowledge appropriate to their current and growing cognitive development levels? If you have not read much about recent progress in brain science—and especially its applications in education—you might want to investigate some the documents and videos listed in the References and Resources section at the end of Chapter 1.

Each chapter focuses on a specific area of brain science in education. The grouping of topics into chapters—and indeed, the order of the chapters—is somewhat arbitrary. My suggestion is that you browse the Table of Contents and feel free to go directly to a topic that interests you.

If you are specifically interested in dyslexia, you will find that the treatment of this topic in Chapter 8 is relatively independent of the content of the preceding chapters. Each chapter is relatively self-contained, and ends with a section on References and Resources related to that chapter.

While most of the items in References and Resources are specifically cited within the chapter, occasionally one will fall into the category of "additional suggested resources. This lists all of the videos referenced in the book, organized by the chapter in which they appeared.

Getting Started When I study a subject that is somewhat unfamiliar to me, I like to look at some of the older literature in the field.

What were the frontiers of the field a decade or two ago? Michael Merzenich is a world-class researcher and developer in educational applications of brain science. I strongly recommend that you view this video before proceeding further in this book. A Brief and Enjoyable Interlude Before you get involved in the deep aspects of brain science and its applications to teaching and learning, I want you to enjoy a classic, short video about teaching tennis Gallwey, The first two items listed below are cited in the Preface, and the remainder are not.

The uncited materials provide background information that many readers will find interesting and useful. Inner game of tennis. Quoting from the website: Timothy Gallwey author of "Inner Game of Tennis," demonstrates how to teach tennis without teaching.

A woman who doesn't know how to play tennis at all, can play within 10 minutes. Growing evidence of brain plasticity.

Brain Science - IAE-Pedia

Neuroscientist Michael Merzenich looks at one of the secrets of the brain's incredible power:Symptoms of Autism vary in both type and degree and can develop gradually, but the condition is usually recognized by age three, and often sooner. An infant with autism does not react to social stimulation with healthy behavior such as babbling, laughing, smiling, or making eye contact.

Understanding the mysterious disability of autism

Disability Information for Someone who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Customized Example Autism is a disability. For right now, there is no special medicine or treatment that would make it go away.

Social Security Disability and SSI Benefits for Autism | DisabilitySecrets

No one can catch it from being near you. People with an autism spectrum disorder usually live a normal life span. Understanding Death and Illness and What They Teach about Life: An Interactive Guide for Individuals with Autism or Asperger's and Their Loved Ones [Catherine Faherty, Gary B Mesibov] on iridis-photo-restoration.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Finally, family members and professionals have true guidance for these difficult, but necessary, conversations. Fragile X syndrome is commonly a cause of autism and intellectual disability. Andre Fenton, professor and senior author of the citation says, “The findings suggest that neurological circuits, although fundamentally intact, could be improperly tuned which in turn results in inflexible learning’s.”.

The Arc’s Autism Now Center is the nation's source for resources and information on community-based solutions for individuals with autism, other developmental disabilities, and their families. A national initiative of The Arc.

Understanding the mysterious disability of autism

As we have seen in the United States in vibrant real time over the last several years, the media have become a battleground for the powerful to fight it out with the goal of altering public.

The Neanderthal theory of autism, Asperger and ADHD